Everyday People

Sam Agnew, Everyday People Founder Business Stories

Everyday People

Sam Agnew, Founder

Running a business isn’t easy, it takes passion, tenacity and grit, I’m inspired by people who start businesses, particularly those who are driven by purpose over profit.  My mission is to make growing a business easier.


 

 

I wish I’d trusted my gut

My original vision for Everyday People was a place where people could find all the support they need to grow a business. However, I spoke with a business advisor who convinced me that I needed to be more niche. So I decided to focus on outsourcing.

 

The problem I was solving

Business owners don’t have enough time or all the skills it takes to grow a business, so they outsource work.  Often, asking their network for recommendations, which is usually met with umpteen eager responses.

Every time I tried this approach, it was fraught with problems. Mainly because those making the recommendations had a limited understanding of the work required, and in some cases, hadn’t actually worked with the person they were recommending.

Driven by my desire to help businesses avoid costly mistakes, I set about creating a bespoke freelance platform.

 

A black book of ‘good people’

In my mind, Everyday People was going to be a virtual black book of good people. Skilful freelancers and consultants, passionate about making a positive impact.

Everyday People got off to a great start. An MVP (minimum viable product) up and running in no time. Despite the bad reputation freelance platforms had, it was easy to get freelancers onboard, and quality projects started to come in.

 

Where there’s a will there’s a way

The platform’s back-end was pretty labour intensive, and to scale the business, this needed addressing. My developers started to work on improvements, but partway through, they went out of business, and I’d run out of money.

Another developer offered to finish the improvements in return for me doing some work for them. The time it took to do this almost crippled the business.

 

It started to feel soulless

After the initial momentum of getting my idea off the ground, the reality of running a freelance platform started to feel soulless, and I began to question the impact it was having. Some freelancers didn’t get work, and that weighed heavy on my mind.

I spent hours and hours walking, and I read book after book in an attempt to help me find a way forward.

My ‘why‘ hadn’t changed, but I didn’t love the ‘how‘.

 

I decided to call it a day

After persevering for too long, I decided to call it a day.

It was a difficult decision as I felt a responsibility to the founding members of Everyday People. I still desperately wanted to help businesses, and I didn’t want all my hard work to be in vain.

 

I needed to be doing something useful

At the start of lockdown, there was a flurry of support for businesses. Though, with so much information on the internet and social media, it was hard to keep up with what was available, let alone make an informed decision about what was best for your business.

It was a difficult time and I felt compelled to do something useful.

I didn’t want people to be limited to the information in their networks or need to decipher often random Google search results. So, to make the support easy to find, I began to collate details into searchable directories.

As the directories started to grow, I realised that Everyday People was turning into my original vision  – a central point where people can find the best support for their business.

So rather than calling it a day on a business that just didn’t feel right, Everyday People has become a labour of love.

 

What I’ve learnt so far

➤ It’s essential, I do something I’m passionate about and makes a difference to others.

➤ To trust my gut,  but back it up with a bit of due diligence.

➤ Continuing to learn ignites my creativity and builds confidence in my own abilities.

 

 


EVERYDAY PEOPLE
Explore our platform to find support, inspiration and resources to help your business grow.


 

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